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20121027
20121104
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)
coyle of the national law journal. >> woodruff: and spencer michels looks at the complaints about apple's maps and the high stakes for those trying to come up with something better. >> the battle over digital map making indicates how crucial this field has become and it could bode well for consumers as the maps get better. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the u.s. death toll from the giant storm named sandy has risen to at least 63 today. about 6.5 million homes and businesses are still without electricity though there were signs of daily life returning to its usual rhythm in some places. a familiar sound returned to lower manhattan streets last night. ( horns honking ) the power did not. police helpe
indiscriminately and kill a lot of civilians, that's also a violation of international law. >> warner: but the threat of legal action offers no protection to these students, who now dream of what they'll become when they grow up. >> dentist. >> teacher". >> warner: no one can tell them when this war will end, what kind of country they will inherit, and whether they'll live to fulfill those dreams. >> brown: next, immigration may not be a front-burner issue for the presidential candidates right now, but it is something many voters care about in the swing state of iowa. paul yeager of iowa public television reports on how demographic shifts in his state are changing the political landscape. his story is part of our new collaboration with public media partners across the country from areas that will likely determine the outcome of the election in a series we call "battleground dispatches." >> reporter: last fall, in the run up to the republican caucuses, illegal immigration was a hot topic on the campaign trail in iowa. >> if you hire someone who is illegal, we're going to sanction you.
: they will say we're playing by the rules." >> absolutely. those are the rules. it's the law. they are allowed to do that until the law changes they are well within their legal rights to do it. >> brown: so where else? stay with the outside spending playing a big role. where do you see that? >> one state where it's sort of reversed is in indiana where the democratic candidate has been getting more of a benefit. in that state joe donnelly has spent less of his own money on ads than the outside democratic groups so that's another big one. and virginia is huge and i've been told by people who watch these things closely, the people who watch who's up and who's down that it's made a significant difference in virginia the republican candidate george allen has been vastly outspent. i think he's spent about $3 million on ads. outside groups have spent about $14 llion on ads and that has allowed him to complete blow for blow with tim cain. >> brown: the interesting other case is massachusetts, lots of money, tons of money but not from outside, right? >> exactly. the two candidates, scott brown and eliz
, and it explores clashes of culture and law between tribal and state jurisdictions in investigating a crime. i talked with louise erdrich recently and asked her how she came to write the book. >> i was really haunted for years by the background, the political background. but i didn't want to write a political diatribe of any sort. so i waited and waited to have some character come to me and speak to me abou this situation. >> so if it started with this issue, then let's explain the issue. because, and it's not giving away much of the move told say there is this jurisdictional problem, right, of law, who is a native, who has jurisdiction over crimes. but what is it that you wanted to explore. explain the problem. >> well, i'm-- there's a legacy of violence ainst native women that has gotten worse and worse over time. d historically the underpinnings lien the complex nature of land tenure on native reservations. each piece of land has a different jurisdictional authority. a lot of this, there's attempts to solve this. one of the most recent was sponsored by senator patrick lehy of the senate jud
data because i live in virnia where the election privacy laws are unusually strict. the best he could do is show me the kind of data he could collect on a hypothetical voter like me. >> wow. the type of clothes that i buy. whether i have a gold card. if i have a pool. if i have a pet. if i'm a nascar fan. veteran. smoker. but why are these details so valuable to the campaign? so do the campaigns care about what kind of car i drive, what kind of music i listen to? >> only if it has to do... if it says something and predicts something about the way you're going on vote. you may not vote republican because you drive a corvette. but there may be a correlation between people who own corvettes and voting behavior. if there is they're going to exploit that correlation and try to find as many corvette owners as they can. >> reporter: the ability to predict voter behavior is what makes all of this data so powerful. once the campaigns collect all of this seemingly random information about us, they feed it into sophisticated mathematical formulas, called algorithms which are used to predict vote
by federal law rather than the constitution. congress could change that date. there's actually provision for, if a state doesn't get its vote in on time, basically for the state legislature to make a decision about which electors to send to vote for president. so there are actually ways for that to happen. i just don't think anybody is that the a point right now. >> ifill: if you're in massachusetts or connecticut and your constituents don't have power, they're not watching the ads, maybe the voting machines aren't working, sandy could have a more direct effect. >> i think we're going to have to wait for that week. it will have an effect certainly on the candidates' abilities to communicate their messages in the last days. a lot of candidates will hold back money so that they can barrage voters with ads in the last week. some of the candidates that have done this time may find out it wasn't a good idea to husband all that money. perhaps they should have put the money out earlier. obviously nobody could have predicted this. >> ifill: when the people get their power back, they will see ads. >>
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)